Integrated Farming
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Wildflower area seeded in 2016

We believe that the way to operating a successful farm is by looking forward. When implementing growing practices we are constantly asking the question, “what impact will this have down the road?” The best way we know to ensure the productivity of our land, with this question in mind, is to mimic the natural systems that surround us. This involves growing a diversity of crops, rotating crop families, cover cropping and establishing riparian buffers as well as hedgerows.


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The pigs enjoy whatever extra produce we have on hand

Beyond these practices, we also believe in integrating crop production with raising livestock. While individual crops are rotated every season, every five years or so, land previously in crop production will be seeded back into pasture in order to support livestock. In doing so, the nutrients in the soil are replenished and pest pressure diminished.


While transitioning our cropland from conventional to organic production we strictly follow the rules set by the National Organic Program, but feel it is necessary to go further in some circumstances. Being limited in what we can, and should, use to manage pests, fungus and disease we take these extra steps of rotation in hopes of avoiding the arms race seen in so much of our agriculture.